The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest

The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest

by Stieg Larsson

Debbie Weiss: I absolutely loved "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo" and I really liked "The Girl Who Played With Fire" so I was very much looking forward to Stieg Larsson's third book in the trilogy. I was glad to become reacquainted with the characters with whom I had become quite familiar, Michael Blomquist, Lisbeth Salander and Erika Berger. As mentioned by other reviewers, the plot was a bit confusing because so many different parties were invoved with familiar sounding names. I definitely would have been lost if I had not read the first two books. While the story was certainly interesting, I found Salander a little too unbelievable this time around. So, my feeling was that this was a nice read, but a bit disappointing.
Rating: ***

Judy Stanton: Despite the fact that it was pretty long....and that the number of characters and subplots could get a little overwhelming...and that the end tied up all loose ends a little too perfectly....I still really enjoyed the last of the Larsson trilogy. The story moves quickly, the plot sucks you in, and the bad guys get caught! It really helped to have read the previous two books; I'm not sure I could have followed the storyline otherwise. Larsson again got me caught up in the mystery; the computer hacking to expose the guilty; and Salander as super woman, solving it all in due time! A fit ending to three great books.
Rating: ****

Janet Kolodner: I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I read all three books over the past few weeks while on an extended trip (not all vacation). I stayed up way too late at night reading all of them. This one I decided I had to finish one night, and I stayed up until 3:00 AM. Not great literature, but a wonderful romp.
Rating: ****

Gail Reid: The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest may be the most anticipated mystery in modern times. The sequel to The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and the Girl Who Played with Fire, the third book in the trilogy promises answers to the many unresolved issues around Lisbeth Salander. Salander is remembered as the anti-social, anti-authoritarian computer hacker who solves a murder in book 1 and is nearly killed at the end of book 2. Much of the book is devoted to the resolution of Salander's second attempt to murder her father Alexander Zalachenko, a former Soviet spy who defected to Sweden and gained protection from a rogue organization within the secret police. There is an excessive amount of background infused with Swedish history and politics which at times threatens to engulf the rest of the story.

Michael Blomkvist, the investigative journalist works tirelessly to free Salander from the crimes with which she is charged. Many of the same characters from the Millenium magazine return but the story becomes increasingly convoluted as more and more characters are introduced and numerous subplots emerge. Larsson does an exemplary job of tying up loose ends; but with an endless list of characters - all with similar sounding Swedish names - the book is not nearly as riveting as the previous two.
Rating: ***

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